skip to content »

litmuseyon.ru

Dating china marriages

dating china marriages-16

As the first marriage taboo in Chinese history, consanguineous marriage emerged during the middle Neolithic Age, which banned a parent-offspring marriage but allowed the marriage of people of the same generation (such as the brother and sister of a family).The representative consanguineous marriage was between Fu Xi (one of the Three August Ones and the Five Lords) and Nv Wa, who were blood brother and sister.

dating china marriages-78dating china marriages-66dating china marriages-65dating china marriages-86

If the fortune-teller said it was ok, the marriage ritual would continue.Forbidden Marriage between People Bearing the Same Surname The forbidden marriage policy on people bearing the same surname was launched and carried out in the Western Zhou Dynasty (1046 BC-771 BC) to guarantee a clear feudal patriarchal hierarchy and order of inheritance (such as the throne and property).People of the same clan and surname were not allowed to get married in the Tang Dynasty (618-907), especially among members of royalty.Dictates of Parents and Advice of Matchmakers Free love was absolutely banned in ancient China and was widely condemned as an offence to public decency according to the traditional Confucian ethic codes, so it was the task of parents to arrange marriage for their children in order to maintain order of the traditional patriarchal society.Not only was the arranged marriage formally favored by society, but it was also politically supported and enhanced by law in ancient China.In the primitive society, the ancestors of the Chinese people lived in groups and had no fixed spouses, and they had sexual relationships indiscriminately with one another.

Owing to their weak gender awareness, they didn't felt ashamed and weren't bound by customs and etiquettes.

As the patriarchal social system took place of the matriarchal social system, the private ownership of property came into being, on which the ancient monogamous marriage was based.

In the ancient monogamy marriage stage, the husband owned everything in the family, including his wife, children and property, and the main task of women was bearing children to carry on the paternal lineages.

Matched Social Status The marriageable age was 20 for males and 16 for females in ancient China, and an ideal standard of marriage was well-matched in social and economic status for the two families.

In the Western Zhou Dynasty (1046 BC-771 BC), the intermarriage between noblemen and commoners was absolutely forbidden by law.

The implementation of the nine-rank system in the Wei (220-265), Jin (265-420), Southern and Northern Dynasties (420-589) resulted in a rigid feudal hierarchy system, making it impossible for a noble to get married with a commoner.